Thursday, June 23, 2011

Ask Your Rifts/Palladium Questions Here!

Since I've been talking quite a bit about Palladium lately, I thought it might be fun to have an open commentary thread where people can ask any questions they want about Rifts and Palladium Books. I'm not a company representative, just a long-time GM who's found some things that have worked really well.

So, if you've ever had a question about Rifts or Palladium characters, classes, GMing advice, setting, rules, how to handle something, classes, etc., feel free to ask in the comments and I'll try to answer to the best of my knowledge. Heck, you can ask me what's up with your neck of the woods in Rifts Earth! There's a chance a few more Palladium Game Masters might be around to answer things, as well. My two faves are Rifts and Palladium Fantasy, but I'll do my best to answer anything else you might have. Heck, ask me about kitchen-sink gaming in general; it's one of my favorite topics.

Let's face it: there's always a lot of talk about the way Palladium does this or that. There remain a lot of dedicated fans out there who love Palladium's games. If you've ever had a question on just about anything to do with Rifts or Palladium, now's your chance.

44 comments:

Deimos said...

OK, I'll give it a go with a couple of questions:

1. What's the best starting class for someone new to Rifts?

2. Someone said Vagabonds class start with a piece of candy. Is that correct, and what is the reasoning behind it?

Zachary Houghton said...

@Deimos:

1)If we’re just talking about the Rifts main book and someone wants something really standard, my advice is steering away immediately from the Dragon Hatchling. Skill monkeys might want to look into the Rogue Scholar or Rogue Scientist, whereas the Headhunter or Merc Soldier options are nice for people wanting to mess stuff up. If they want a sampling of supernatural powers, the Mystic lacks some of the firepower of a Mind Melter or Ley Line Walker, but is a good hybrid to get a feel for it all. None of those classes I listed have extensive tracking or anything. Another fun one is Operator, which can make a player feel immediately involved given their ability to repair and operate computers and machines. That’s from my experience as a Rifts GM.

2)Yeah, they (the Vagabond OCC)start with a “bit of candy”. I think it’s just one of those items to denote their travelling, miscellaneous nature. I’ve had players try to lure monsters with the candy, or eat it when in the wild and low on rations (“Hey! Remember, I’ve got candy!”. Otherwise, it's just a random bit of trivia. :)

Marshall Smith said...

These questions are about RIFTS, as I've only glanced at Palladium Fantasy.

1) What are your thoughts on the skill system? I find it pretty ludicrous, personally. Some skills (Boxing) are practically required, and some are totally useless (Sewing). And yet, there's very little distinction. Also, the percentile increment system bugs me.

2) How much do you use "rules as written" in your game? Do you use a lot of house rules? Do you do a lot of winging it?

3) How do you distinguish between psychic powers and magic in terms of flavor? I mean, ISP and PPE aren't really that different, and the psychic powers aren't that different from spells. I've always wanted the two systems to be more radically divergent.

4) Do you allow all sourcebooks in your game?

sirlarkins said...

Some good questions already. I'm looking forward to seeing how the thread develops.

For my own question, I'll play off of Deimos's first: when starting a new campaign, do you limit available OCCs? If so, how?

(Personally, if I were to start a Rifts campaign nowadays, I'd build it around a theme--Coalition military squad, or vampire hunters, or whatever--that would tend to self-select certain OCCs.)

Zachary Houghton said...

@Marshall:

First off, thanks for the questions!

“1) What are your thoughts on the skill system? I find it pretty ludicrous, personally. Some skills (Boxing) are practically required, and some are totally useless (Sewing). And yet, there's very little distinction. Also, the percentile increment system bugs me”.

-You’ve already hit on one of my house rules. I nerf Boxing; no more +1 attack. If you don’t, you end up with a group where everyone was an amateur boxer in their past. ;) The rest I actually allow for Profession/Craft skills to nail anything not already listed. We use a flat 5% increment, and because I love open-ended roll-over systems, we’ve changed it from roll-under, with the dice open-ending on a 96-00. Again, nothing earth-shattering, and all easy to implement. It just fits my table’s style better, I think.

“2) How much do you use "rules as written" in your game? Do you use a lot of house rules? Do you do a lot of winging it?”

-I have about a page of house rules, mostly clarifying combat. The others are rules on our Muilligan Stones (GM rewards allowing rare rerolls) or my d30 rules (allowing any player to sub a dice with a d30 once per session). It’s actually about as rules-heavy as a group playing D&D 3e or Pathfinder and ignoring a lot (most?) of the heavier stuff except the basic mechanics. Most situations not supported by the rules, I adjudicate.

“3) How do you distinguish between psychic powers and magic in terms of flavor? I mean, ISP and PPE aren't really that different, and the psychic powers aren't that different from spells. I've always wanted the two systems to be more radically divergent.”

-Man, that’s a good question. I guess mechanically or in terms of flavor, you begin to see a big difference at the larger mage levels, when they’re opening Rifts and causing mini-cataclysms. Psychics are usually more self-reliant for their big moves, whereas a Ley Line Walker or High Magus is going to be searching for that PPE Power Supply. I’ve heard of people dividing Rifts Magic up into more formal schools, but that’s probably not my style.

“4) Do you allow all sourcebooks in your game?”

-My standing rule is ANY OCC/RCC choice needs to be approved. What I do is give a list of books where stuff is LIKELY to be OK (such as New West, Atlantis, Mystic Russia). There are some classes, like the Anti-Monster in the South America books or some of the creatures in Dark Conversions that can be problematic, especially for a novice group. I also hand out a list of OCCs, RCCs, and races that are definitely approved. It’s got about 100 OCCs on it, and I could probably add more.

If you need clarification on any of these, just let me know. Of course, all answers come with the proviso that this is at my table; it’s in no way official; it’s just how I’ve handled things.

Zachary Houghton said...

@sirlarkins:

“For my own question, I'll play off of Deimos's first: when starting a new campaign, do you limit available OCCs? If so, how?

(Personally, if I were to start a Rifts campaign nowadays, I'd build it around a theme--Coalition military squad, or vampire hunters, or whatever--that would tend to self-select certain OCCs.)”

Really, everything comes through me. I’m also a strong proponent of group character generation, which I think helps everyone see where everyone else is coming from and meter things accordingly.

As I mentioned above, I have a handout with both a recommended list of OCCs/RCCs and books that will probably be ok. If it’s on the list (say, a Dwarven Rogue Scholar, Quillback, Human Ley Line Walker), you’re going to be fine. Outside of that, better to ask. With hundreds upon hundreds of different class/race options, I find providing a list also gives some support to newer players who might otherwise feel overwhelmed.

I’ve done themed games before, such as your all-Coalition party there, and that also works very well. For our upcoming campaign, it’s a mercenary group in Midwestern N. America for starters, so that sort of leaves the door more wide open, but at least I know I’m probably not going to have a Whale Singer OCC pop up. ;)

Thanks for the questions! I’m happy to try to answer anything else out there.

Anonymous said...

Lurker here--

1) Is there a place to find a stripped own basic outline of combat for Rifts?

2) Palladium used to make OCC specific character sheets--did they ever make these for R:UE, and are they available online anywhere?

3) As an aside, I never minded Boxing--I viewed it as representing sparing/tournament training for HTH, not "boxing" boxing (which is HTH: Expert).

4) Is there an easy way to do stats for enemies and monsters?

Deimos said...

Thank you for answering my questions! I have one more (for now!).

I have the 2nd Edition (?) book of Palladium Fantasy RP (gift from my family), though I haven’t really used it much yet aside from reading through a few times. If I wanted to use the races in that book with Rifts, how easy is that to undertake?

Zachary Houghton said...

Hi Anonymous! Lurkers are more than welcome!

“1) Is there a place to find a stripped own basic outline of combat for Rifts?”

Offhand, I can’t think of one, but one of the readers might volunteer. We’re putting together some things showing exactly that for Palladium’s Megaversal Ambassadors, so you can watch the site for a link to that once it’s done. A Rifts Quick Start has been on my wish list for a long time!

“2) Palladium used to make OCC specific character sheets--did they ever make these for R:UE, and are they available online anywhere?”

The character sheets specific to Phase World are still hosted online. On the Cutting Room Floor right now, they have those and the basic Rifts Character sheet:

http://www.palladiumbooks.com/index.php/resources/the-cutting-room-floor/242-character-sheets


“3) As an aside, I never minded Boxing--I viewed it as representing sparing/tournament training for HTH, not "boxing" boxing (which is HTH: Expert)”.

I think the problem many people have with it is that’s it’s selected overly much due to the excellent combat bonus/edge it’s giving. There are plenty of groups who play with it as-is, of course.

“4) Is there an easy way to do stats for enemies and monsters?”

Personally? I steal. I tweak a lot of the NPC stats from the various books for more important baddies, especially. A quick “Rifts NPCs” Google search reveals several sites.

I also have sheets of potential baddie stats, so I can throw together, say, a Coalition patrol easily with a few quick stat lines. Something like:

-Coalition Grunt (Recruit) C-12 Rifle, 70 MDC armor, +0 Perception, Standard military array of skills and “Dead Boy equipment”

-Coalition Grunt (Veteran) CP-40 Laser Pulse Rifle, 80 MDC armor, +1 Perception, Standard array of skills +10%, standard “Dead Boy” equipment with newer suit.

I do this for a couple of varying levels of Grunt, RPA Pilot, Skelebot models, noting weapon damage and the like, and I’m on my way.

Zachary Houghton said...

Hi Deimos!

“I have the 2nd Edition (?) book of Palladium Fantasy RP (gift from my family), though I haven’t really used it much yet aside from reading through a few times. If I wanted to use the races in that book with Rifts, how easy is that to undertake?”

-Yes you can. You can use Rifts Conversion Book 1 as well, but there’s no reason you can’t take an Ogre or Elf from Palladium fantasy for Rifts. They’ll be SDC creatures as you have them, but they’ll jive right in. As I mentioned, though, Conversion Book 1 for Rifts has all sorts of fun new races, including the ones from Palladium Fantasy.

Deimos said...

Thank you for your answers--

OK, one more and I promise I’m done!

If I’m buying Rifts, the Conversion Book, and one or two world books, which book would you say I should get?

Ryan said...

1.) Do you do Mega-Damage and MDC as written?

2.) Are you willing to share your combat house rules?

3.) How do you handle PCs of very different power levels? Do you have Body Fixers and Rogue Scientists running with Combat Cyborgs and Mega-Juicers? If so, how do you keep things interesting for the big MD powerhouses without each encounter threatening to vaporize the poor guy in Plastic Man armor?

Zachary Houghton said...

Hey guys, I have my answers for you, but we're having Internet issues. Will have them up later this evening. Thanks, and keep em coming!

Zachary Houghton said...

Sorry for the delayed responses, guys; bad internet issues earlier.

@Deimos:
Hi Deimos!

Well, it really depends on what you want. I love the West, so I loved New West, which I still feel is one of the most well-rounded world books ever—new settlements, weapons, classes, and world info. Mystic Russia’s pretty amazing, too.

If you think you want to run a Coalition campaign, fittingly, World Book 11 is Coalition War Campaign. Honestly, it’s just a question of what you want. Some books are better for equipment and weapons, others for classes, still others for setting info. I’d say as a great compromise, consider getting World Book 11 (Coalition War Campaign) and World Book 14 (New West). If you’re looking for pure, undiluted power, check out the Phase World supplements or the South America books.

Vampire Kingdoms is also great for a big area to rampage in, and still has the relative low-power level of early Rifts.

@Ryan:
Hey Ryan!

1) Yes, I pretty much handle Mega-Damage as-is. It makes a quick distinction between a .22 trying to hurt a tank and a laser pistol cutting through a wood wall. If there’s a place where it falls down, we work with it from there.

One thing I used is a general morale check. If someone’s getting just hammered, they might run. Very few armies fight to the death; that’s no different in Rifts. Yeah, the Headhunter gang had a suit of power armor, but after all their support was taken out with the fusion block, he knew better than to stick around.

2) Combat

Combat? Yeah, it’s pretty straightforward. Mages can cast whenever (1 action) unless it’s opening a Rifts or something. Your basic actions when attacked are to parry, dodge, roll with punch/impact, or You can’t dodge bullets or ranged attacks if you don’t see them coming, otherwise you’re at -10 to dodge on ranged attacks of that sort. Dodging takes an action; if you have more than four attacks per round you have to stagger them; no taking all 8 of your extra attacks as the last action of a round. I already mentioned by d30 rule, which allows any dice roll to be replaced with a d30 (limit 1x/session). When used carefully, it can end things abruptly.

Is there something in particular in combat that's really bugging you or that seems not to work?

3) My philosophy for different power levels is that there’s no way I can mechanically get Rifts to a point of pure balance. It’s not going to happen. It’s up to the GM to drive balance, and that’s done primarily by a) framing the sort of game you’re going to play beforehand (all-Coaltion, random merc company), b) ensuring character generation happens as a group (cuts down on the outliers and gives people a chance to sort of see where others are going), and c) give out a list beforehand of recommended classes/race, etc. that are probably going to work for the game.

Once it’s time for the game, though, I know it’s fully probable I’m going to have a Vagabond next to a Mind Melter next to a Glitter Boy. What I do is try to give everyone the opportunities or face time they want as a GM, and remember the ideas of superhero organizations such as the Justice League or the Avengers. Hawkgirl or Plastic Man aren’t in the same as Bats or Wonder Woman, but they still have their spotlight, still have their space. No one character, hero or otherwise, can do it all by him or herself. Any fight can have multiple challenges; yeah, someone’s gotta slug it out with the SAMAS Power Armor, but someone needs to get to the cells and free the prisoners. Someone’s gotta sabotage the response force before they can get there, and yeah, someone might need to hack into their computers to pull what they can for the resistance. When you get into a lot of things happening in at once in a battle for Rifts, your puny Rogue Scholar with his Plastic Man armor becomes much more valuable.

Sorry if that’s a long response, but #3’s always a big point of mine when playing Rifts.

Great questions! If anyone else has anything, we can keep this going!

DNAphil said...

Ok...can you explain number of attacks, with Attacking, Dodging, and Parry?

When I was younger I thought that you always got to Dodge or Parry an attack, and that your number of attacks were how many attacks you could do each turn.

Was that right or do all attacks, dodges, and parries, come out of your number of attacks for a turn?

Zachary Houghton said...

@DNAPhil:

(Btw, reviewing your upcoming work. Wow!)

Dodge does make you lose an attack/action. Parrying does not.

So if I’m in a sword fight, I can parry all day and still attack on my turn. If I happen to have lost my sword and am just trying to survive long enough for someone to rescue me, I’m either going to dodge and lose an action, or have to take it on the chin if I don’t want to lose an attack.

“Dodge=Deduct”, is what I sometimes tell players.

Basically, the generally agreed-upon interpretation is that a character starting with Hand to Hand: Basic is going to have 4 base actions/attacks per round. The wording was a bit confusing between earlier iterations and the Ultimate Editions, but that’s what we run as well.

Anonymous said...

Anonymouse/lurker again--

How do you deal with maps in Rifts? Do you use any kind of regional/sandbox style maps for the game? What about local tactical ones?

sirlarkins said...

Oooh, good question Anonymous Lurker! I've dabbled with the idea of doing a sandbox Rifts map myself.

I'll add another question inspired by AL's: what do you do about ley line mapping? With several OCCs capable of ley line phasing/communication, it becomes rather vital to know where the local ley lines lie, but actual information on this has always been so incredibly sparse. It's actually such a pet peeve of mine, it's why I simplified ley lines in my 2112 setting.

Zachary Houghton said...

Welcome back, Anonymous!

There are actually some really awesome maps of Rifts North America out there. One of the really fun things is to take a USGS map of an area and just tweak the heck out of it, re-imagining what it’s like after the Rifts came.

For example: Grant County, Indiana. I took a county map, looked at bodies of water, marked what towns and cities were ruins, and tried to think if anything might survive after the Cataclysm, and went from there. Taking a little piece of wilderness in Rifts Earth and making it your own is sort of like RPG homesteading. ;)

I’ve actually made a few maps here and there, including two I’m working on right now (for my aforementioned Grant County project and the Free Town of Grant). If you’re looking for a starting community, books like Rifts Canada or Arzno detail numerous settlements, in part or in whole, and include maps.

Here’s a link on maps you might like as well that details a lot of the places of Rifts N. America:

http://palladium-megaverse.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=104785

Aside from that, for a lot of smaller tactical maps, I use my Steel Squire Flip-Mat, same as always.

Zachary Houghton said...

@sirlarkins

Well, we know of several key nexus points. We know Old Chicago’s pretty nasty, there’s the giant gateway one in the St. Louis Arch, and several other places (Calgary, etc.).

I’ve generally gone off of those, but Rifts are also not always stable things. They grow or contract, might open once every five years, and some might seem to explode with energy, only to phase back down. As a result, in my Rifts campaigns, ley lines are not a stable network.

Still, there have been referenced multiple fairly stable ley lines in Rifts books, and I believe many of the key ones have been documented on that aforementioned map. Here’s version 1.2 (there’s a 1.5 that I will dig up in a bit that’s got some changed), with the ley lines marked as light blue.

In a lot of ways, it’s like the old steamboat captains trying to plot the Mississippi River. Yeah, that sandbank is here this time, but the river could cut an entirely new channel or divert away entirely!

Anonymous said...

Hello there—different anonymous lurker here (AL-2?)

Are the Phase World Books its own RPG? I see people reference Rifts Phase World a lot, like it is a separate thing.

Zachary Houghton said...

Hey there, AL-2!

Phase World is not a standalone RPG. You need the main Rifts book for it. That said, the reason many people list it separately is that it has garnered its own separate identify in some ways as a *galactic* space science-fantasy/sci-fi/kitchen sink setting. You can certainly run it as its own setting with the Palladium rules or mix and match. All the Phase World books are still just listed as Dimension Books, putting them within the Megaverse proper.

Not a lot of Phase World stuff shows up in my games on Rifts Earth, but it can and does happen.

Mikey97D said...

Hi Zachary,

I have rule handling question regarding a scenario that I decided on which I am not happy with my decision as a GM.

An evil character calls their group into a huddle to discuss a plan. The group are all players including the evil character. The evil character comes up with a gun in the huddle to blast the rest of the group away. The group does not expect this shock/horror. How do you handle the combat & shock?

Thanks,
Mike

Zachary Houghton said...

Hey Mike,

I guess it depends on the kind of group and campaign you have. If you’re in the sort of group where screwjobs and tricks like that are encouraged or admired, then you gotta roll with it. The evil character gets his laughs, but who’s gonna trust him again?

If you’re in the sort of group that’s agreed to all adventure together and have fun with it, then someone doing that is sort of a jerk move, yeah? If you want to break character and talk to the guy that that’s not the sort of game you’re running, that’s always an option. If it’s just the player being a jerk, then that’s something that needs to be handled as to whether or not you want him or her in your game.

Outside of that, preventing or reacting to it?

I probably would have given everyone a perception check against his Concealment or whatever he was using to see if that was a possibility. Alternately, precognition abilities like Sixth Sense are a perfect defense against that. And at the end of the day, depending on how many players there are and their vulnerability, he might get the first shot, but the group can get the last laugh.

If you want to keep it all in-game, you can always have a big distraction—(an attack) hit the whole group just when the evil guy was going to act out his plan, or, somewhat more clumsily, the guy gets order from his boss/deity/whatever that he needs to keep the cannon fodd—er, I mean—other characters alive for now.

I guess I would need to know a bit more about your group dynamic and the like before I said anything further on it. Honestly, though, crappy situations like that come up for us GMs. I don’t think there is a perfect way of handling it; internal party strife is a problem that usually gets worse when you get That Evil Guy.

Good question, though. Feel free to tell us more.

Anonymous said...

Hey hope I'm not too late for one more:

I know some magic weapons like Millenium Staffs (from Millenium Trees, right?) and other weapon might look mundane, but inflict MDC damage. Does this mean if you whack someone with it as a warning or something they instantly vaporize?

(I like that--AL-2!)

Zachary Houghton said...

Hi Al-2,

No, I mean, it's like a sword in Pathfinder or D&D that causes 2d6 damage. If you lightly tap someone with it, it's not going to injure them. Intent is the big thing. If I've got an enchanted stave that can do MD damage, nudging you with it won't inflict that damage. If I trip you with it as you walk by, it won't dissolve your foot. Basically, for weapons like that, you need to have the intent of full-on, actual combat to get the MDC damage result.

Marshall Smith said...

RE: maps. Years ago I picked up an out of date road atlas for like $2 and started marking it up for Rifts. Works pretty darn well. You can probably do better with the internet these days.

RE: actions. My GM had a neat house rule for actions. Each round was divided into five phases. If you only get one action (we used the more conservative interpretation for number of actions), you go on phase 3. Two actions has you going on phases 1 and 3. Three actions on 1, 3, and 5. Et cetera. It worked great for us. It was especially cool as a juicer, when I was one of the few people who could act on phase 4.

RE: MD weapons. I always found the idea that MD weapons vaporize targets to be odd. They simply punch through any and all armor. Something narrow and piercing like a laser or rapier would just put a hole right through you. Plasma would pretty much always vaporize things, because it spreads and splashes. A MD staff could be swung with supernatural strength to splinter bones and crush internal organs.

RE: balance. The important thing, as a GM, is to provide spotlight balance. Give every character a chance to be awesome. If you have a mega-juicer dominating every combat, put the party in a murder mystery where the city rat and mystic dominate the scene. Also, work to add a lot of story to the game (something that many Rifts campaigns I've heard about lack). There's so much awesome in this setting, and most of it hangs together remarkably well given the gonzo nature. Having a dog boy explore what it means to be almost-but-not-quite human can be very cool.

Marshall Smith said...

And, as a another question for Zach, how do you handle cash in your campaign? We rapidly discovered that cash is king, and can unbalance the campaign very rapidly. Especially when our psi-ghost discovered that he could very easily steal our enemies' robot vehicles and trade them in. It got silly, fast, even with basic controls like ruling that not every city has well-stocked arms dealers.

Zachary Houghton said...

Hey Marshall!

First off, nice tips. I am 100% with you on "Spotlight" balance especially. Sounds like we run our games pretty closely the same on that mark.

Regarding credits, I think a big part of it is just rarity of items. In my Rifts Earth, outside the big population center, it's almost impossible to buy an energy weapon or decent MDC armor for close to a decent price. Plus, adventuring is expensive; weapons can break on fumbles (we roll for that), you go through armor like disposable diapers, and if you can steal from someone, well, they can steal from you. If the characters are imprisoned, there goes their stuff (yeah, I have no issues doing that from time to time).

The sheer upkeep of an adventuring band cancels out a lot of their money. Yeah, there's some ways to make a killing quickly, but plenty of ways to lose it, too. That's always sort of been my guiding philosophy.

Marshall Smith said...

Yeah, that sort of worked well for us for a while. Until the story took us to Tolkeen. We traded in half a dozen robot vehicles for a crap load of armor and weapons. It was like leveling up three times in one session.

It became blindingly obvious that mages and psychics need XP, but everyone else just needs cash.

Zachary Houghton said...

Hey, if they can take down a half dozen robot vehicle, more power to them! :)

Marshall Smith said...

It wasn't so much "taking down" as "taking." We discovered that the psi-ghost is ludicrously broken. Phase in, kill the unarmored crew, phase back out. Voila, one pristine robot vehicle.

Zachary Houghton said...

See, I almost never see Psi-Ghosts in my game. Sounds like the Coalition needs some psionic disruption shields!

It also sounds like your players made a killing!

EvoJ said...

I have been trying to play an Operator in a Rifts game for the past month or so and we are having a seriously difficult time figuring out the Time required for repairs. We found the costs of different items and such (which are WAAAAAY off what we think they should be) but we can't find any times associated anywhere.

Heck in the Ultimate edition it talks about "An operator can slap together temporary repairs in half the time that last twice as long (See Jury Rig Skill)" but the jury rig skill only tells you how long the repairs will last... not how long they take to make.

It is infuriating when my GM says "Well that is 156 M.D.C. damage you are trying to repair.... 124800 credits or so...and you can generate double your skill in creds a day.. with your tools 488 creds a day with your skill... That comes to 255 days to repair your Robot."

And think about that in "Building a robot dog." 2.5 million / 488 = 14Years!

Please help! There has to be a better way!

Dvalin21 said...

Zach,

If one of the earlier Rifters, it talked about the lightbringers and how some of the weakly born's souls were used for making magic weapons, but the book never expanded on this. Do you know of any New Righter or Nightbane book that does? Thanks

Joe said...

Ok, so I have kind of a beginner question here, but the Book of Magic isn't very clear on how exactly "sense magic" works. It says it can be used to sense the strength of any magic within range, and it can also be used to indicate whether a person or object is enchanted. I take this to mean one or the other per casting, but not both; so, if the player casts the spell to find out if the dagger they just picked up is enchanted, they're not going to sense the magic ring crown hidden in the corner. What's your opinion?

Joe said...

Anonymous wrote:
>>>I know some magic weapons like Millenium Staffs (from Millenium Trees, right?) and other weapon might look mundane, but inflict MDC damage. Does this mean if you whack someone with it as a warning or something they instantly vaporize?<<<

I also like to throw in a pull punch roll when appropriate. A critical failure on the pull punch means that the action resulted in a full swing (with gm discretion if I don't want the recipient to get killed on accident.) It's a little tricky, but it adds a little realism and chance. Kind of like "but officer, I was only trying to bump him with my car but I accidentally hit the accelerator instead of the brake." Just to be fair, I always give the recipient an auto dodge and then a roll with the punch.

justin said...

i have a question about the operator occ for rifts. are they able to invent new wepons or tecnolgy

Joe said...

This totally unofficial and may not be as black and white of an answer as you're looking for, but...

I never like to quash my players creativity (unless they're driving me nuts with overload); so, I take the idea, look at the skills needed and compare that to the characters skills and roll play them getting help if they don't have all the needed skills.

Now, back to your specific question. I think an operator may have what it takes, but it totally depends on the skills they've selected and the item they want to build. You can't build a ham radio from scratch without some skill in electronics, after all.

RPGamer said...

Here's a question about template stacking.

I was trying to create a character the other day, and came up with really odd stuff.

To start off, I wound up rolling an Experiment power class, and choosing to go with the Supersoldier Option, since it fit better with the story I was coming up with.

The oddities I came across were multiple A.R. rating (one from the minor ability [Heavyweight -- AR 8] and the Supersoldier ability [Invunerable -- AR 13].

Do I combine the two or take the highest?

My next question relates to the Supersoldier ability [Transformation] which grants many bonuses, but specifically, the +1d6 P.S AND strength equals minor ability of superhuman strength.

Does this mean the character gains everything listed for that minor ability, [i.e. Add 20 +2d4 to current attribute...] in addition to the prior bonuses for the super soldier's transformation ability?

Thom Shorts said...

Can a Danzi be a Beastmaster?

justin peters said...

My question about boxing is...

Is the +1 attack used all over the place? D
oes it come into play when you are unarmed?

Anonymous said...

What if you don't want to roll for attributes? Is there a standard array?

Marshall Smith said...

Oh, man, I'd forgotten about this thread. This was an awesome re-read. And cool, since I am currently posting my d20 conversion rules over at http://divisionnihil.blogspot.com/

Justin, the bonus attack from boxing applies to all combat. It's pretty buff. Some GMs nerf it with house rules.

Anon, the standard array doesn't work so well in Rifts. That's because stats only matter if they are above 15 (though I understand R:UE fixed that a bit). And if you happen to roll above 15, you get to add an extra die. So you tend to end up with a few attributes in the 10-12 range, and a couple in the 18-20 range. It's super wacky.